Pirelli P Zero

13 Worst Tire Brands To Avoid

Tires make or break your ride. You can have the best car on the market, but terrible tires can ruin the experience. With over 400 brands in the North American market alone, there are plenty of options, making navigating it intimidating. Heck, even luxury vehicle tires can miss the mark. 

While no tire is perfect, there are some brands (and models) you should hesitate to purchase. Remember to consult online reviews and the opinions of others with similar brand and model cars and trucks for their experience. 

Here are 13 of the worst tire brands and models to avoid to keep yourself safe and sound on the road.  

Used Tires

Used Tires
Image Credit: Santeri Viinamäki/WikiCommons.

Let’s get this out of the way right now: regardless of brand or model, used tires are a gamble. We don’t care if they were only used once. Even tires known for their high quality, like Michelins, shouldn’t be purchased used. A used tire is still used, therefore risky to use with your vehicle. Do yourself a favor and only opt for brand-new tires for your car. We’re begging you. 

B.F. Goodrich

B.F. Goodrich
Image Credit: Ildar Sagdejev/WikiCommons.

A hit-or-miss brand, B.F. Goodrich mostly has a good reputation for their tires. But some tires are stinkers, like the KM3 mud-terrains or even the KO2 model, depending on who you ask. Suppose you go for a B.F. Goodrich tire, do thorough research, and avoid getting whatever tires you see first. Thankfully, many are backed by a 50,000-mile warranty, so if you end up getting a dud, you can be protected. 

Linglong Crosswind 

Linglong Crosswind 
Image Credit: eBay/Pinterest.

Hoping for a tire that holds up in the snow? Don’t expect Linglong’s Crosswind tires to be the right fit. While these tires are solid for regular weather, they won’t hold up in deep snow on any car or truck. Compared to other market picks, they’re also pricey and not worth the money. 

Goodride

Goodride
Image Credit: 70_musclecar_RT+6/Flickr.

Goodride tires do the exact opposite of their namesake. We don’t know for sure, but Goodride sounds a little too close to Goodyear and could easily fool someone less versed in the world of tires into picking them up. Key complaints of Goodride models have included an inability to adapt to different weather conditions, being too slippery when it’s raining or wet, or being too rigid in dry climates. 

Geostar

Geostar
Image Credit: Tire Co/Flickr.

Have you ever wanted to lose grip while driving your car? No? Then don’t opt for a Geostar tire. You’ll also lose traction in wet and dry environments, making it even more dangerous and unreliable. Don’t even think about getting them for driving in the snow. Out of the Chinese tire market, these are gigantic duds.   

Calstar (Carlisle) 

Carlisle tire
Image Credit: eBay/Pinterest.

Recently rebranded from Carlisle to Calstar tires, the brand isn’t known for good quality. When surfing reviews, you’ll quickly find complaints of quick blowouts (as in multiple tires in less than a year) or general unreliability, ranking far under the average tire in terms of longevity and quality. Remember–a rebrand doesn’t mean the tire itself has changed. 

Compass 

Compass
Image Credit: shinya suzaki/Flickr.

Don’t expect this compass to guide you anywhere. While these tires are for cycling and not for cars, bikers should be just as keen on getting quality tires for their bikes. When combing reviews of Compass brand tires, key complaints are its longevity (approximately six miles before it pops) and damage to the rim from the damage. For over $150 a set, we’ll pass.   

Goodyear G159

Flat Tire Replacing Closeup Photo. New Tire For the Modern Vehicle.
Image Credit: Virrage Images/Shutterstock.

Goodyear is known for great tires…except for that one time. That was the G159 model made for R.V.s produced from 1996 to 2003. Due to several accidents traced back to the G159s, Goodyear finally recalled the dangerous tires. And for good reason…several of the accidents were fatal. Investigators found that tread separation in the tire was responsible for the accidents. You’ll often see it listed as the worst tire of all time. 

Pirelli P Zero

Pirelli P Zero
Image Credit: Maxi-Napo-99/WikiCommons.

Just because they come on flashy sports cars doesn’t mean they’re good tires. Often paired with vehicles like Dodge Challengers or Ford Mustangs, the Pirelli P Zero has a reputation for slipping and sliding on the road–not great if you’re driving a vehicle made for speed. Some reports even mention them falling apart, cruddy treadwear, or squeaking noises while driving. 

Douglas

Douglas
Image Credit: Nice Pay/Pinterest.

An offset of Goodyear, Douglas tires are often described as mediocre at best. They’re priced cheap, which is a big draw for many consumers, but you’ll probably buy another tire just as quickly. (Psst… don’t expect a Douglas to handle gravel roads.) Of course, if you don’t plan to drive your car or truck that much, it could be an option. But, like most drivers, you need a tire that can handle anything. 

Author: Gretchen Gales

Bio:

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Gretchen Gales is a freelance writer, the executive editor of Quail Bell Magazine, and the author of the poetry chapbook Agora. Writing for nearly a decade, her work has appeared in Business Insider, Next Avenue, The Huffington Post, Bustle, and others. Gretchen has also been interviewed for Her Campus as part of their “How She Got There” series and an interview with the popular website Dear English Major. 

Gretchen, a knowledge geek and educator, loves breaking down complicated concepts into something everyone can understand and enjoy. A Jill of all (Writing) Trades, there aren’t many topics she hasn’t written about. 

 

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