Ford LTD Country Squire

24 Coolest Station Wagons That’ll Make You Want to Trade In Your Car

Station wagons aren’t just about hauling groceries and kids to soccer practice. They’ve got stories to tell and miles of style to show off. We’re talking about wagons that turned heads on the street and made a mark in the car world. Here are 24 seriously cool station wagons that have rolled through automotive history.

Chevrolet Nomad

1960 Chevrolet Nomad
Image Credit: Greg Gjerdingen/WikiCommons.

From 1955 to 1972, with a starting price of $2,571, the Chevrolet Nomad brought flair and style to the wagon segment. The early models had a two-door design, a sleek roofline, and fins, and were crazily attractive. Although the Nomad name was later used for less appealing wagons and even a van, the 1950s models stand out for their beauty and are now highly loved classics.

Aston Martin DB5 Radford

Aston Martin DB5 Radford
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The Aston Martin DB5, famous for its association with a certain secret agent, gained an even more exclusive variant with the Radford-built DB5. Created initially for David Brown, the head of Aston Martin, to accommodate his lifestyle needs, the Radford DB5 became a coveted model among other Aston owners. The extensive body modifications and high conversion cost made it a luxurious and rare wagon, with only 12 built.

Mercedes Benz 300TD

Mercedes Benz 300TD
Image Credit: FotoSleuth/WikiCommons.

From 1979 to 1985, the Mercedes Benz 300TD hit the scene with a splash, starting at $24,569. It wasn’t just any wagon; it was the wagon to have if you liked the finer things in life. Loaded with features like anti-lock brakes, a driver airbag, and power windows, it was the kind of car you’d spot in fancier neighborhoods. Today, people love it for being super reliable and for its classic vibe.

BMW 3 Series Touring

BMW 3 Series Touring
Image Credit: Dinkun Chen/WikiCommons.

The BMW 3 Series Touring’s origin story is as unique as the vehicle itself. Born from the frustration of a BMW engineer who couldn’t fit his family and gear into his E30 sedan, the Touring was the result of a six-month DIY project. When BMW’s management saw the finished product, they were so impressed that they launched it with only minor changes. The E30 Touring’s success, with over 103,000 units built, is a testament to its practicality and appeal.

Chevrolet Chevelle Wagon

Chevrolet Chevelle Wagon
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From 1963 to 1977, starting at $2,852, the Chevrolet Chevelle Wagon was a muscle car that felt right at home in any driveway. While its design may not have turned heads, its performance certainly did. Available with a big-block V8 engine, this wagon could effortlessly handle heavy loads, yet still outrun sportier cars. 

Rolls-Royce Phantom II Shooting Brake

Rolls-Royce Phantom II Shooting Brake
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The Rolls-Royce Phantom II, produced in the 1930s, showcased the pinnacle of luxury and engineering. This particular Shooting Brake model, with a history including ownership by notable figures and a journey across continents, represents the height of bespoke automotive craftsmanship. Its unique wooden body and powerful straight-six engine make it a standout in the Rolls-Royce lineage. Sold for $285,000 in 2020, it’s a true classic, combining elegance, history, and functionality in an unforgettable package.

Willys Model 463 Jeep

Willys Model 463 Jeep
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The Willys Model 463 Jeep, produced from 1946 to 1981 and starting at $6,525 in 1951, was a pioneer with its all-steel wagon design. Known for its faux wood grain and spacious cargo area, this Jeep set a standard for future wagons and hinted at the brand’s SUV future with the introduction of four-wheel drive in 1949. 

Lynx Eventer

Lynx Eventer
Image Credit: Alexander Migl/WikiCommons.

The Jaguar XJ-S/XJS was already a desirable GT car, but the Lynx Eventer took it a step further by adding practicality. With only 67 made, and this particular one receiving TWR upgrades, the Eventer is a rare gem. It’s a perfect example of how a classic car can be stylish and functional. 

Oldsmobile Vista Cruiser

Oldsmobile Vista Cruiser
Image Credit: MercurySable99/WikiCommons.

Produced from 1964 to 1977, with a starting price of $3,270, the Oldsmobile Vista Cruiser was what we call a cultural icon. Famous for its rear-facing third-row seats, skylights, and powerful Rocket V8 engine, the Vista Cruiser was a standout of the 70s. It had its quirks, but it’s a memorable part of many families’ lives. 

Mercedes-Benz S123

Mercedes-Benz S123
Image Credit: Alexander Migl/WikiCommons.

The Mercedes-Benz 123-series was a game-changer for the iconic brand. Priced to attract a broader audience, it didn’t skimp on quality, packing advanced technology and robust engineering into its compact frame. The S123, Mercedes-Benz’s first factory-built wagon, marked a significant milestone. Decades later, the Mercedes-Benz lineup without a wagon seems unimaginable. 

Ford LTD Country Squire

Ford LTD Country Squire
Image Credit: Sunstarfire/WikiCommons.

Spanning a remarkable four decades from 1950 to 1991 and starting at a modest $2,253, the Ford LTD Country Squire was an American icon. Known for its wooden doors and side panels, this wagon was a marvel of its time. The “magic doorgate” offered versatility unheard of back then, functioning both as a tailgate and a swing-open door. Its vast 19-foot length, V8 engines, and cool features like side-facing seats, a magnetic checkerboard, and a CB radio made it a popular family vehicle. 

Volvo 1800ES

Volvo 1800ES
Image Credit: WikiCommons.

The Volvo 1800ES only had a brief production life. Originating from the P1800, designed to compete in the sports car market, the 1800ES emerged as a unique two-door sports wagon. Even though it faced some stiff competition, Jan Wilsgaard’s design triumphed. The engine modifications provided a smoother driving experience, and its spacious interior made it great for road trips. 

Pontiac Safari

Pontiac Safari
Image Credit:SsmIntrigue/WikiCommons.

Produced between 1956 and 1991 and starting at $3,140, the Pontiac Safari was not just a single model but a range of station wagons spanning various Pontiac lines. The Grand Safari, built on the Bonneville and Grand Ville body, was especially impressive. Measuring over 19 feet in length with ample interior space, it was a behemoth of a wagon. Tragically, its size became its greatest limitation, especially in urban neighborhoods where smaller vehicles like SUVs were more practical. 

Packard One-Twenty Deluxe Station Wagon

Packard One-Twenty Deluxe Station Wagon
Image Credit: Steve Sexton/Flickr.

The Packard One-Twenty holds a special place in automotive history, emerging as a savior for the brand during the Great Depression. It offered a luxurious mid-market option, featuring a straight-eight engine and great craftsmanship. The 1941 models, available in Standard or Deluxe options, were particularly notable for their woodie design, crafted with white ash and mahogany. 

Dodge Coronet

Dodge Coronet Super Bee
Image Credit: WikiCommons.

From 1965 to 1976, starting at $2,650, the Dodge Coronet redefined the family sedan and wagon. Equipped with powerful V8 engines, including the legendary 7-liter Hemi and 7.2-liter Magnum, the Coronet was a symbol of automotive audacity. It proved that family vehicles could pack serious muscle, winning the hearts of buyers and even outselling other Dodge muscle cars. However, its final years saw a shift towards wood-paneled wagons, reflecting the changing preferences and realities of the oil crisis era.

Audi RS2

Audi RS2
Image Credit: Audi RS2/WikiCommons.

The Audi RS2, born from the vision of Ferdinand Piëch, was a cool blend of wagon utility and sports car performance. Collaborating with Porsche, Audi transformed the humble 80 Avant into a powerhouse, capable of outperforming the illustrious McLaren F1 in a sprint to 30mph. With extensive upgrades to its engine, suspension, and brakes, the RS2 was a technical marvel, offering a 0-60mph time of 4.8 seconds. 

Chrysler Town & Country

Chrysler Town & Country
Image Credit: AlfvanBeem/WikiCommons.

The Chrysler Town & Country, with a production run from 1941 to 2016 and an initial price of $2,950, has a rich history as the original “woodie.” Evolving from a wagon with genuine wooden doors and panels to a chrome-laden 19-foot behemoth by 1968, it epitomized the changing face of American station wagons. 

Fiat/Autobianchi Giardiniera

Fiat/Autobianchi Giardiniera
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“Back in 1960, Fiat hit it big with the 500, and they decided to take things up a notch with the Giardiniera. Think of it as the Fiat 500’s roomier cousin, built for families who needed a bit more space. They stretched out the wheelbase and tucked the engine under the back, making sure you could fit everyone and their stuff without feeling cramped. In ’68, Autobianchi took over, adding a bit of Italian style to the mix. The Giardiniera was perfect for driving around with four people and their bags, proving that good things do come in small packages.

AMC Hornet Sportabout

AMC Hornet Sportabout
Image Credit: the Rambler Ranch collection in Elizabeth, Colorado/WikiCommons.

From 1972 to 1977, with an affordable starting price of just $2,587, the AMC Hornet Sportabout was a real game-changer. This car took what everyone loved about AMC’s best-seller and turned it into a nifty hatchback. Think of it as the early inspiration for the liftgate hatches we see on modern SUVs. The Sportabout combined practicality with style, making it a hit with families. It was perfect for everything from daily errands to longer road trips.

Cadillac Fleetwood Brougham d’Elegance Station Wagon

Cadillac Fleetwood Brougham d’Elegance Station Wagon
Image Credit: CZmarlin/WikiCommons.

Cadillac wasn’t really into making station wagons, but they decided to shake things up with the Fleetwood Brougham d’Elegance Station Wagon. This wasn’t your everyday wagon; it was a custom job by RS Harper Custom Coachbuilders, made especially for a Detroit car dealership. What’s cool about this wagon is how special it was – it even had a sunroof! It was so loved that the dealership owner’s mom ended up making it her personal ride.

Mercury Commuter

Mercury Commuter
Image Credit: JOHN LLOYD/WikiCommons.

Between 1958 and 1962, starting at $2,903, the Mercury Commuter broke the mold as a two-door wagon, a rarity at the time. Its sleek, finned design, available in eye-catching colors like pink and teal, set high expectations for what a wagon could be. Equipped with a Lincoln V8 engine, the Commuter offered luxury at a more accessible price point. Although it transitioned to a more conventional four-door wagon, the early Commuter models remain a symbol of style and innovation.

Morris Minor Traveller

Morris Minor Traveller
Image Credit: Peter Trimming/WikiCommons.

The Morris Minor Traveller, with its distinctive wood-framed rear, joined the Morris lineup five years after the original model’s launch. The Traveller’s construction required the expertise of MG, known for handling wooden bodies. The move to more vibrant colors and its production alongside vans and pickups at the Adderley Park plant added to the Traveller’s charm. 

Oldsmobile Cutlass Cruiser

Oldsmobile Cutlass Cruiser
Image Credit: Greg Gjerdingen/WikiCommons.

Produced from 1978 to 1996 and starting at $5,447, the Oldsmobile Cutlass Cruiser evolved from a compact car to a quintessential family wagon. Its transformation into the iconic “grocery-getter” marked a significant shift in the Cutlass line. Pretty soon, the wagon variants of the Cutlass, including the Cieras, Supremes, and Calaises, became staples in family driveways.

Lancia Thema 8.32 Estate

Lancia Thema 8.32 Estate
Image Credit: Lebubu93/WikiCommons.

The Lancia Thema 8.32 Estate was a real head-turner, packing the elegance of a luxury sedan and the muscle of a Ferrari 308 engine under the hood. Sure, it was a bit out of the ordinary with its front-wheel drive, but it still delivered some serious speed and had an interior that was all about luxury. 

Author: Abbie Clark

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